Language Services For Maracaibo

Maracaibo is a city in north-western Venezuela and the capital of Zulia state, known as the centre of Venezuela’s oil industry. Its old town is marked by colonial buildings, including the colourful houses lining Calle Carabobo. On central Plaza Bolívar, Maracaibo Cathedral houses the statue of the Cristo Negro, or Black Christ. Nearby is the 18th-century Casa de la Capitulación, a culture and history centre. Maracaibo, Lake, largest lake of South America, c. 5,100 sq. mi (13,210 sq. km), NW Venezuela, extending c. 110 mi (180 km) inland. A strait, 34 mi (55 km) long, connects it with the Gulf of Venezuela.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

Founded in 1574 as Nueva Zamora de la Laguna de Maracaibo by Captain Pedro Maldonado, the city became a transhipment point for inland settlements after Gibraltar, at the head of the lake, had been destroyed by pirates in 1669. It was not until the first decades of the 17th century that the first town was settled. Culture in Maracaibo is very indigenous and unique, is recognized in every state and city in Venezuela, and is very influential with its gaitas, desserts, style, living, and customs. Most major houses of advertising in Venezuela acknowledge how opposite the culture of Maracaibo is from that of Caracas. A Jewish population of several thousand was concentrated in the major cities, especially in Caracas and Maracaibo. A minuscule number of Indians, particularly in the Amazon area, continued to practice their traditional religions, but many had adopted Roman Catholicism.

Brief City  History

Maracaibo, city, capital of Zulia estado (state), northwestern Venezuela. Maracaibo is the country’s second-largest city and one of its largest seaports. Located on the western shore of the channel connecting Lake Maracaibo with the Gulf of Venezuela, it is in a basin surrounded by higher land that excludes the steady trade winds and suffers from high temperatures (average daily highs are in the 90s °F [about 30 °C]) and high humidity. Maracaibo’s founding date is disputed. There were failed attempts to found the city—in 1529, by Captain Ambrosio Alfínger, and in 1569, by Captain Alonso Pacheco. Founded in 1574 as Nueva Zamora de la Laguna de Maracaibo by Captain Pedro Maldonado, the city became a transhipment point for inland settlements after Gibraltar, at the head of the lake, had been destroyed by pirates in 1669. It was not until the first decades of the 17th century that the first town was settled. Although Maracaibo changed hands several times during Venezuela’s struggle for independence from Spain—patriots won a decisive naval battle on Lake Maracaibo on July 24, 1823—the area was generally less involved in the wars than were eastern and central Venezuela. Until petroleum was discovered in 1917, the city was a small coffee port. Within a decade it became the oil metropolis of Venezuela and South America. It has remained a city of contrasts—old Spanish culture and modern business, ancient Indian folklore and distinctively modern architecture. The dredging of the channel connecting the lake with the Caribbean in the late 1950s stimulated the economy of all of north-western Venezuela and quickened the maritime life of the city. Important industries, other than the large and rapidly growing petrochemical industry, include construction, food, soaps, woven goods, beverages, and rope. Farming and tourism are important to the city’s economy as well. The University of Zulia was established at Maracaibo in 1946, and it is one of the 12 universities and 14 institutes of technology that have sites in Maracaibo. The city is linked by highway to each of the major urban centres of northern Venezuela; a bridge 5 miles (8 km) long spans the channel 3 miles (5 km) south of Maracaibo. Pop. (2001) 1,571,885; (2011) 1,898,770.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

There are at least forty languages spoken or used in Venezuela, but Spanish is the language spoken by the majority of Venezuelans. The 1999 Constitution of Venezuela declared Spanish and languages spoken by indigenous people from Venezuela as official languages.

Important Types of Commerce in Maracaibo

Important industries, other than the large and rapidly growing petrochemical industry, include construction, food, soaps, woven goods, beverages, and rope. Farming and tourism are important to the city’s economy as well.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Maracaibo

Maracaibo is attracting foreign investors through its Foreign Direct Investment policy more than ever. The importance of translation and localization of the Spanish language is increasing at a rapid pace. Spanish translation is an important aspect to consider to reach the wider audience and localizing technical documentation, writing and editing sales and marketing literature, or editing software, copyright, trademark and patent applications, partnership and employment agreements, mergers, acquisitions and incorporations, trusts and wills.

Looking for a Spanish translation company? Look no further. American Language Services (AML-Global) offers certified translations, native interpreting services, and turn-key localization solutions for any language. Call us today @ 1-800-951-5020 for further information, visit our website https://www.alsglobal.net/ or for a quick quote click http://alsglobal.net/quick-quote.php.

 

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