Language Services For Madurai

Madurai is an energetic, ancient city on the Vaigai River in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Its skyline is dominated by the 14 colorful gopurams (gateway towers) of Meenakshi Amman Temple. Covered in bright carvings of Hindu gods, the Dravidian-style temple is a major pilgrimage site. Millions attend the processions and ceremonies of April’s Chithirai Festival celebrating Meenakshi and Lord Vishnu. MADURAI Formerly called Madura, Madurai is the second-largest city in Tamil Nadu. It is located on the river Vaigai and is surrounded by the Anai (elephant), Naga (snake), and Pasu (cow) hills.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

The ancient history of the region is associated with the Pandya kings, and Madurai was the site of the Pandya capital (4th–11th century). Later it was conquered by Chola, Vijayanagar, Muslim, Maratha, and British rulers. The people of Madurai are amicable, hospitable, and deeply respect and value their traditions. Though Salwar Kameez, a North-Indian ethnic wear for women, has made deep inroads into the city’s populace, many prefer the traditional Indian wear of Thavani or Bhavani, also called Half Sarees, and Sarees. According to the religious census of 2011, Madurai had 85.8% Hindus, 8.5% Muslims, 5.2% Christians and 0.5% others.

Brief City  History

Madurai, formerly (until 1949) Madura, city, south-central Tamil Nadu state, southern India. It is located on the Vaigai River, about 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Dindigul. Madurai is the third most populous, and probably the oldest, city in the state. The ancient history of the region is associated with the Pandya kings, and Madurai was the site of the Pandya capital (4th–11th century CE). Later it was conquered by Chola, Vijayanagar, Muslim, Maratha, and British rulers. In the 1940s it became known as the centre of the civil disobedience movement against British India, and it remained an important seat of political leadership. The compact old part of the city—enclosed by the Anai, Naga, and Pasu (Elephant, Snake, and Cow) hills—is centered on Meenakshi Amman (Minakshi-Sundareshwara) Temple. The temple, Tirumala Nayak palace, Teppakulam tank (an earthen embankment reservoir), and a 1,000-pillared hall were rebuilt in the Vijayanagar period (16th–17th century) after the total destruction of the city in 1310. The city walls were removed by the British in 1837 to enable Madurai to expand, and administrative and residential quarters were established north of the river. Madurai is a major transportation hub for southern India, with road and rail lines radiating from the city. There is also an airport just south of the city, providing both domestic and international passenger and freight services. Large-scale industry has developed in the suburbs. Predominant are cotton spinning and weaving and the manufacture of transport equipment, tobacco, and sugar. Small-scale hand-loom weaving of silks and cotton, which have made Madurai famous throughout history, remains important. In the early years CE, Madurai was well known for its Tamil shangam (literary society), and a new shangam was established in 1901. The city is home to Madurai Kamaraj University (founded 1966) as well as to medical and law colleges. In addition, the city has a bench of the Madras High Court in Chennai (Madras). Lying southeast of the Eastern Ghats, the region surrounding Madurai occupies part of the plain of southern India and contains several mountain spurs, including the Palni and Sirumalai hills (north), the Cardamom Hills (west), and the Varushanad and Andipatti hills (south). Between those hills in the west lies the high Kambam Valley. Eastward, the plains drop to 300 feet (90 meters) above sea level but contain isolated hills. The chief river, the Vaigai, flows northeast through the Kambam Valley and then east across the centre of the state.

The region has never been self-sufficient in rice, despite the completion of irrigation projects on the Periyar (1895) and Vaigai (1960) rivers. Its chief cash crops are peanuts (groundnuts), cotton, sugarcane, coffee, cardamom, potatoes, and pears. The area is also renowned for its jasmine-flower plantations. Pop. (2001) city, 928,869; urban agglom., 1,203,095; (2011) city, 1,017,865; urban agglom., 1,465,625.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

The main language of Madurai is Tamil. It is spoken by the majority of the populace of Madurai. The form of Tamil spoken in Madurai is almost pure and does not have any influence of other languages. The other languages spoken in Madurai are English, Saurashtra, Telugu, Urdu and Hindi.

Important Types of Commerce in Madurai

Madurai is an important industrial and educational hub in South Tamil Nadu. The city is home to various automobile, rubber, chemical and granite manufacturing industries. It has developed as a second-tier city for information technology (IT), and some software companies have opened offices in Madurai.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Madurai

Doing business with Madurai requires an understanding of their local language which is Tamil. An individual or business is required to have a Tamil interpreter accompanying them in Madurai for an exhibition, business negotiations, training, conference, medical support or for an excursion to bridge the language gap. Moreover, they also require Tamil Translation services for translation of important business documents such as sales and marketing literature, copyright, trademark and patent applications, partnership and employment agreements, mergers, acquisitions and incorporations, trusts and wills flawlessly.

Looking for a Tamil, English, Saurashtra, Telugu, Urdu and Hindi. translation company? Look no further. American Language Services (AML-Global) offers certified translations, native interpreting services, and turn-key localization solutions for any language. Call us today @ 1-800-951-5020 for further information, visit our website https://www.alsglobal.net/ or for a quick quote click http://alsglobal.net/quick-quote.php.

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