Language Services For Kumasi

Kumasi is the capital city of the Ashanti Region, in southern Ghana. It’s known as a center for Ashanti culture. In the huge, open-air Kejetia Market, stalls sell everything from glass beads to Ashanti sandals. The National Cultural Centre offers craft workshops and dance performances. It includes the Prempeh II Jubilee Museum, which displays jewelry and ceremonial clothing belonging to the 20th-century Ashanti king. Kumasi also spelled Coomassie, city, south-central Ghana. Carved out of a dense forest belt among hills rising to 1,000 feet (300 metres), Kumasi has a humid, wet climate.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

Kumasi was founded in the late 17th century, on the crossroads of the Trans-Saharan trade routes by the Asantehene Osei Tutu. The town functioned as the political capital of the historic Greater Asante Union, also referred to as Asanteman (Twi) or Ashanti Empire. Kumasi (historically spelled Comassie or Coomassie and usually spelled Kumase in Twi) is a city in Ashanti Region, and is among the largest metropolitan areas in Ghana. Kumasi is near Lake Bosomtwe, in a rain forest region, and is the commercial, industrial and cultural capital of the historical Ashanti Empire. The country has an area of 238,538 square miles and a population of 22 million. According to the 2000 government census, approximately 69 percent of the population is Christian, 16 percent is Muslim, and 15 percent adheres to traditional indigenous religious beliefs or other religious groups.

Brief City  History

Kumasi, also spelled Coomassie, city, south-central Ghana. Carved out of a dense forest belt among hills rising to 1,000 feet (300 metres), Kumasi has a humid, wet climate. Osei Tutu, a 17th-century Asante king, chose the site for his capital and conducted land negotiations under a kum tree, whence came the town’s name. Located on north-south trade routes, Kumasi became a major commercial centre. After defeating the Asante empire in 1874, the British opened new trade routes in the region, thereby greatly reducing Kumasi’s influence as a clearinghouse. The city did not revive until the early 1900s when the British took control; cacao cultivation was introduced, and the railroad from Sekondi was built. A rapid population increase led to the city’s expansion and to the drainage of swamps, the installation of a sewage system, and modern city planning. Kumasi remains the seat of the Asantehene (Asante king) and the site of the Golden Stool, a symbol of royal authority and unity of the people. Billed as the “Garden City of West Africa,” Kumasi is zoned into commercial, industrial, and residential areas. The population is dense in the oldest part of town within a 2-mile (3-km) radius of the British fort (1897), which now houses the Ghana Regiment Museum. It is situated near the site of the Asante palace, which was destroyed by the British in 1874. The old town has been modernized with paved streets, parks, and gardens and is dominated by the Kumasi Central Hospital. Besides schools and teacher-training colleges, there are the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (founded 1951, university 1961) and research institutes for crops and soil. The Asante Cultural Centre supports a museum, a zoo, and a regional library. Remains of traditional Asante buildings (designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1980) are located northeast of the city. The wealth of Kumasi is derived from its location at the junction of Ghana’s main roads and from cacao farming in the hinterland. Trade and mining contribute to the local economy. Handicrafts, such as traditional kente cloth, are significant sources of income. Pop. (2000) 1,170,270; (2010) 2,070,463.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

English, plus several local languages, including Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi.

Important Types of Commerce in Kumasi

Economic activities in Kumasi include financial and commercial sectors, pottery, clothing and textile. There is a huge timber processing community in Kumasi serving the needs of people in Ghana.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Kumasi

Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi are the official languages of Kumasi. For any industry to penetrate into Kumasi, it’s exceptionally important to use a professional translator when you want to translate Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi. Many business sectors, including Automobile, Legal, Medical, Agriculture, Tech, Science, Government and so on utilize professional Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi translation services to flawlessly translate their important documents. A professional Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi translator with an expert understanding of the use of vocabulary and grammar is best equipped to handle the specific nuances of this unique language.

Looking for an English, Ga, Akan, Ewe and Twi translation company? Look no further. American Language Services (AML-Global) offers certified translations, native interpreting services, and turn-key localization solutions for any language. Call us today @ 1-800-951-5020 for further information, visit our website https://www.alsglobal.net/ or for a quick quote click http://alsglobal.net/quick-quote.php.

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