Language Services For Fes

Fes is a northeastern Moroccan city often referred to as the country’s cultural capital. It’s primarily known for its Fes El Bali walled medina, with medieval Marinid architecture, vibrant souks and old-world atmosphere. The medina is home to religious schools such as the 14th-century Bou Inania and Al Attarine, both decorated with elaborate cedar carvings and ornate tile work. Fes, also spelled Fez, Arabic Fās, city, northern Morocco, on the Wadi Fès just above its influx into the Sebou River. The oldest of Morocco’s four imperial cities, it was founded on the banks of the Wadi Fès by Idrīs I (east bank, about 789) and Idrīs II (west bank, about 809).

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

The oldest of Morocco’s imperial cities, Fes was founded in 789 by Idriss I, who was fleeing the Abbasids of Baghdad. He led local Berbers in the conquest of the region and established the Kingdom of Morocco, before being poisoned by the Abbasids. Located north-east of the fabled Atlas Mountains, Fez is Morocco’s cultural and spiritual capital, making it both revered and envied by its rival regions. Home to the world’s oldest continuously in-use university — The University of Al-Karaouine, founded in 859 CE — Fez’s influence on the Arab world is vast. With 93% of its population being considered religious, Islam is the majority and constitutionally established state religion in Morocco. The vast majority of Muslims in Morocco are Sunni belonging to Maliki school of jurisprudence.

Brief City  History

Fès, also spelled Fez, Arabic Fās, city, northern Morocco, on the Wadi Fès just above its influx into the Sebou River. The oldest of Morocco’s four imperial cities, it was founded on the banks of the Wadi Fès by Idrīs I (east bank, about 789) and Idrīs II (west bank, about 809). The two parts were united by the Almoravids in the 11th century to become a major Islamic city. Fès reached its zenith as a centre of learning and commerce under the Marīnids in the mid-14th century and has kept its religious primacy through the ages. The Treaty of Fès (March 30, 1912) established the French protectorate in Morocco. The city is almost completely surrounded by low hills covered with olive groves and orchards. The ancient battlements of Fès, flanked by stone towers, still partly enclose the old city, which is known as the Fès el-Bali. The old city contains the 9th-century Qarawīyīn Mosque and is the seat both of a famous Islamic university (founded 859) and of the Sidi Mohammed ibn Abdellah University (founded 1974); it is also the sanctuary (zāwiyah) of Idrīs I and houses the tomb of Idrīs II. The old city contains a number of well-preserved funduqs (caravansaries). The Fès el-Jedid (New Fès) section of the city, founded in the 13th century by the Marīnids, contains the Royal Palace and the adjoining Great Mosque, which is noted for its 13th-century polychrome minaret. Just south of the Royal Palace is the Mellah, or Jewish quarter; many of the Jewish goldsmiths, silversmiths, and jewelers who once lived there immigrated to Israel in the decades following the founding of the Jewish state (1948). The modern section of the city, the Ville Nouvelle, lies on a plateau to the southwest; it was founded by Marshal L.-H.-G. Lyautey of France in 1916. The city’s industrial quarter is in this district, near the railway station. Fes is a centre for trade and traditional crafts, and until the late 19th century it was the only place in the world where the fez (brimless red felt hat in the shape of a truncated cone) was made. Most of the city’s traditional crafts, such as leatherwork and pottery making, are practiced in the narrow, winding streets of the old city and are sold in that section’s traditional marketplaces, or sūqs. Tourism is a major industry in Fes. The old city was named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1981. Fes has an international airport. The area in which Fes is situated produces cereals (primarily wheat), beans, olives, and grapes; sheep, goats, and cattle are also raised. Pop. (2004) 946,815; (2014) 1,091,512.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

Languages: The most spoken language in Fez is Darija (the Moroccan Arabic dialect), but many people speak French more or less fluently. English is developing, especially among the younger generations. In the countryside outside Fez many people speak Berber dialects.

Important Types of Commerce in Fes

In a nutshell, the main industries in Morocco are phosphate rock mining and processing, food processing, leather goods, textiles, selling of arts and crafts, construction, and tourism. Morocco’s main trading partners are France and Spain.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Fes

People can move from one place to another due to various reasons. Therefore, interpreting is necessary to ease understanding in communication. Some of the reasons may be an adventure, fleeing wars, employment, business and many others. Business, law, education, research, engineering, manufacturing, medical and some of the many fields that require professional translation and interpretation services when doing business in Fez. Proper understanding and knowledge of the local terminologies used is highly essential for essential and quality language service. Moroccan Arabic is the major language spoken in Fez. Industry doing business with Fez will require accurate and consistent Moroccan Arabic language services to grasp the wider market.

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