Language Services For Chifeng

Chifeng, also known as Ulankhad, is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Inner Mongolia, People’s Republic of China. It borders Xilin Gol League to the north and west, Tongliao to the northeast, Chaoyang to the southeast, and Chengde to the south. Chifeng is located in the south-eastern part of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, bordering with Liaoning Province. Its climate is cold and dry in the winter, dry and very windy in the spring. Summer is relatively short and hot, with temperatures dropping rapidly during the autumn.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

In 1729, after many Chinese (e.g., from Shandong, Hebei, and Shanxi provinces) had settled in the area, the subprefecture of Ulaan Hada was set up to control them; it became a county-level town (called Chifeng) in 1778, was raised to a prefecture in 1907, and became a county seat in 1913. The Hongshan culture (simplified Chinese; traditional Chinese; pinyin: Hóngshān wénhuà) was a Neolithic culture in the Liao river basin. Hongshan sites have been found in an area stretching from Inner Mongolia to Liaoning and dated from about 4700 to 2900 BC.

Brief City  History

Chifeng, Wade-Giles romanization Ch’ih-Feng, Mongolian Ulaan Hada, Pinyin Ulanhad, city, south-eastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (qu), north-eastern China. It lies on the upper reaches of the Yingjin River, a tributary of the upper Liaoha River (itself a branch of the West Liao River). The name, meaning “Red Mountain” in Chinese, refers to the red-coloured peak overlooking the city from the northeast. From early times Chifeng has been a key point of communication between the Chinese and their northern neighbours. In the period of invasion and disunion (3rd–6th century AD), it was a stronghold of Xianbei tribal power. Under the Tang dynasty (618–907) it was a centre for the Khitan, a people of Xianbei descent. During the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) it was controlled by the Duoyan Wei, and in early Manchu times (17th century) it was in the territory of the Left and Right banners (local administrative units) of the Öngüt Mongols. In 1729, after many Chinese (e.g., from Shandong, Hebei, and Shanxi provinces) had settled in the area, the subprefecture of Ulaan Hada was set up to control them; it became a county-level town (called Chifeng) in 1778, was raised to a prefecture in 1907, and became a county seat in 1913. Chifeng, which was never walled, was laid out on a spacious plan with solid brick buildings. It has rail links via Jianping, 75 miles (120 km) south, to the mainline from Beijing to Shenyang (Mukden); it is also the centre of a road network leading north into the Da Hinggan (Greater Khingan) Mountains, into the interior plains of Inner Mongolia, westward and southward to Hebei and Liaoning provinces. The city serves as a collecting and shipping point for the pastoral products of the Mongols, which include meat, hides, furs, and cattle. Local coal deposits stimulated the growth of coal mining and, with it, electric power generation, textile manufacturing, and food processing. Much of the surrounding land is under cultivation. Chifeng, Wade-Giles romanization Ch’ih-Feng, Mongolian Ulaan Hada, Pinyin Ulanhad, city, south-eastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (qu), north-eastern China. It lies on the upper reaches of the Yingjin River, a tributary of the upper Liaoha River (itself a branch of the West Liao River). The name, meaning “Red Mountain” in Chinese, refers to the red-coloured peak overlooking the city from the northeast. Chifeng, which was never walled, was laid out on a spacious plan with solid brick buildings. It has rail links via Jianping, 75 miles (120 km) south, to the mainline from Beijing to Shenyang (Mukden); it is also the centre of a road network leading north into the Da Hinggan (Greater Khingan) Mountains, into the interior plains of Inner Mongolia, westward and southward to Hebei and Liaoning provinces. The city serves as a collecting and shipping point for the pastoral products of the Mongols, which include meat, hides, furs, and cattle. Local coal deposits stimulated the growth of coal mining and, with it, electric power generation, textile manufacturing, and food processing. Much of the surrounding land is under cultivation.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

In Chinese dialectology, Beijing Mandarin refers to a major branch of Mandarin Chinese recognized by the Language Atlas of China, encompassing a number of dialects spoken. Cháo–Fēng , an area between the Huái–Chéng cluster and the North-eastern Mandarin, covering the cities of Chaoyang and Chifeng.

Important Types of Commerce in Chifeng

Major industries include mining and ore processing; iron and steel; aluminium; coal; machinery; armaments; textiles and apparel; petroleum; cement; chemical; fertilizers; food processing; automobiles and other transportation equipment including rail cars and locomotives, ships, and aircraft.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Chifeng

Doing business with Chifeng requires an understanding of their local language which is Mandarin. An individual or business is required to have a Mandarin interpreter accompanying them in Chifeng for an exhibition, business negotiations, training, conference, medical support or for an excursion to bridge the language gap. Moreover, they also require Mandarin Translation services for translation of important business documents such as sales and marketing literature, copyright, trademark and patent applications, partnership and employment agreements, mergers, acquisitions and incorporations, trusts and wills flawlessly.

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