Language Services For Arequipa

Arequipa is the colonial-era capital of Peru’s Arequipa Region. Framed by 3 volcanoes, it’s filled with baroque buildings constructed from sillar, a white volcanic stone. Its historic centre is anchored by the Plaza de Armas, a stately main square flanked on its north by the 17th-century neoclassical Basilica Cathedral, which houses a museum displaying religious objects and artwork. Arequipa, city, southern Peru, in the Chili River valley of the Andes Mountains. Arequipa lies at more than 7,550 feet (2,300 metres) above sea level, at the foot of the dormant cone of Misti Volcano, which reaches an elevation of 19,098 feet (5,821 metres). Flanking Misti are Mounts Chachani and Pichu Pichu.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

The bustling Historical Centre of Arequipa is known for Plaza de Armas, where the huge Basilica Cathedral exhibits religious artwork and relics in a museum. The volcanic stone, 16th-century Santa Catalina Monastery offers tours of its village-like citadel. Markets sell jewelry, traditional sweets, and handicrafts made from alpaca wool, and nightlife ranges from low-key pisco bars to boisterous Irish pubs. Arequipa, unlike other big Peruvian cities with mestizo and indigenous features, has been labeled as a “Spanish island in an indigenous sea”, because of its regional cultural features more clearly defined than in the rest of Peru, described as a cultural and natural oasis. Arequipa’s Religious Side. Peru is undoubtedly a very Catholic Country.

Brief City  History

Arequipa, city, southern Peru, in the Chili River valley of the Andes Mountains. Arequipa lies at more than 7,550 feet (2,300 metres) above sea level, at the foot of the dormant cone of Misti Volcano, which reaches an elevation of 19,098 feet (5,821 metres). Flanking Misti are Mounts Chachani and Pichu Pichu. Earthquakes have damaged the city several times, notably in 1600, 1868, 1958, 1979, and 2001. The air is dry, and the climate is pleasant, with an annual average temperature of 58 °F (14 °C) and annual precipitation of about 4 inches (100 mm). Rain falls mainly in December and January, at which time the normally tranquil Chili River swells and sometimes overflows its banks. The city’s supply of drinking water comes largely from glacier-fed reservoirs and aqueducts. The city site has been occupied by various peoples for millennia. Under the Inca empire, Arequipa was an important point on the route from Cuzco to the seacoast. The city was re-founded in 1540 on orders from the conquistador Francisco Pizarro to establish a stronghold in the region, under the name Nuestra Señora de la Asunción del Valle Hermoso (“Our Lady of the Assumption of the Beautiful Valley”). Arequipa has produced many of the country’s leading political and cultural figures, including novelist Mario Vargas Llosa. Arequipa has earned the sobriquet Ciudad Blanca (“White City”) because sillar, a local white volcanic stone, is used in many of its buildings. The seat of an archbishopric, Arequipa has a cathedral (founded 1612; rebuilt c. 1845 and 1868) and several churches dating from the Spanish colonial period, including San Francisco (1552), San Agustín (1574), and La Compañia (1595), with its renowned Plateresque facades. Among the city’s educational centers are the National University of San Agustín (1828) and the Catholic University of Santa María (1961). The historic city centre, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2000, was damaged by a powerful earthquake the following year. On August 15, Arequipa annually celebrates the anniversary of its founding, with a fair featuring non-lethal peleas (bullfights) between pairs of massive, dueling bulls. Arequipa has diversified industries and is a major processing centre for alpaca, llama, and sheep’s wool. It is the commercial, political, and military centre of southern Peru, easily accessible by air, rail, and highway. Arequipa is also a popular tourist centre, with bathing resorts, hot springs, and Inca remains in the vicinity. The fertile soils of the surrounding district produce a variety of crops, notably corn (maize), asparagus, leeks, hot peppers (rocotos), and potatoes. Arequipa, with Peru’s second-largest metropolitan population (after Lima-Callao), has grown nearly fivefold since the 1960s, largely through in-migration from rural areas and from such smaller cities as Puno and Juliaca.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

According to the 2007 Peru Census, the first language learned by most of the residents was Spanish (83.17%), followed by the native language of Quechua (14.78%). The Quechua variety spoken in Arequipa is Cusco–Collao Quechua.

Important Types of Commerce in Arequipa

Over time, Arequipa, located in an Andean valley, established its economy as a key trading hub for small-scale mining and traditional agricultural and textile products such as milk, quinoa, and alpaca wool.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Arequipa

Doing business with Arequipa requires an understanding of their local language which is Spanish. An individual or business is required to have a Spanish interpreter accompanying them in Arequipa for an exhibition, business negotiations, training, conference, medical support or for an excursion to bridge the language gap. Moreover, they also require Spanish Translation services for translation of important business documents such as sales and marketing literature, copyright, trademark and patent applications, partnership and employment agreements, mergers, acquisitions and incorporations, trusts and wills flawlessly.

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