Language Services For Manaus

Manaus, on the banks of the Negro River in north-western Brazil, is the capital of the vast state of Amazonas. It’s a major departure point for the surrounding Amazon Rainforest. Just east of the city, the dark Negro River converges with the brown, muddy Solimões River resulting in a striking visual phenomenon called the “Meeting of the Waters.” The combined tributaries form the Amazon River. Manaus, city and river port, capital of Amazonas estado (state), north-western Brazil. It lies along the north bank of the Negro River, 11 miles (18 km) above that river’s influx into the Amazon River. Manaus is situated in the heart of the Amazon Rainforest, 900 miles (1,450 km) inland from the Atlantic coast.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

The history of the European colonization of Manaus began in 1499 with the Spanish discovery of the mouth of the Amazon River. Being located at the confluence of the Rio Negro and Amazon Rivers, it was a strategic point. On November 13 of 1832, Lugar da Barra was elevated to town status and named Manaus. Manaus is the capital and largest city of the Brazilian state of Amazonas. It is their love for sophisticated European art, architecture and culture with them. Judaism, Candomblé, Islam and spiritualism, among others, are also practised. The city’s Catedral Metropolitan Nossa Senhora da Conceição is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manaus.

Brief City  History

The history of the Amazon’s most populous city, Manaus, dates back to 1669 when it was founded by European colonisers and given the official title of Fort of Sao Jose do Rio Negro. It was listed as a town in 1832, with its name being changed to Manaus, which literally translates to ‘Mother of Gods’. Soon after, it became a city in 1848 and changed its name once more, this time to Cidade da Barra do Rio Negro, which means the ‘City of the Black River’. Less than a decade later, in the year of 1856, the city was given its present-day name of Manaus once more. The Portuguese settlers colonised Manaus in 1669, building a rather basic fortress with several strategically positioned cannons to protect it against possible attacks by the Dutch, who were based within the north-easterly country of Suriname. The Fort of Sao Jose da Barra do Rio Negro, as it was known, was constructed to protect the Portuguese predominance in the region and it served its purpose well for more than a century. By the last years of the 17th century, the population had expanded so much that missionaries decided a place of worship was now necessary. Therefore, a small chapel was erected near the fort, being named the Capela Nossa Senhora da Conceicao, or ‘Chapel of Our Lady of the Conception’. The Amazon region experienced an enormous rubber boom in the latter part of the 19th century, with Manaus, fortunately, being at the very centre of these activities. This was to be the most prosperous time in the history of Manaus, with it being described by some quarters as one of the world’s gaudiest cities, due to the sheer opulence and extravagance displayed by the wealthy rubber barons of this era. Soon after, it became a city in 1848 and changed its name once more, this time to Cidade da Barra do Rio Negro, which means the ‘City of the Black River’. Less than a decade later, in the year of 1856, the city was given its present-day name of Manaus once more. The Portuguese settlers colonised Manaus in 1669, building a rather basic fortress with several strategically positioned cannons to protect it against possible attacks by the Dutch, who were based within the north-easterly country of Suriname. The Fort of Sao Jose da Barra do Rio Negro, as it was known, was constructed to protect the Portuguese predominance in the region and it served its purpose well for more than a century. By the last years of the 17th century, the population had expanded so much that missionaries decided a place of worship was now necessary. Therefore, a small chapel was erected near the fort, being named the Capela Nossa Senhora da Conceicao, or ‘Chapel of Our Lady of the Conception’. The Amazon region experienced an enormous rubber boom in the latter part of the 19th century, with Manaus, fortunately, being at the very centre of these activities. This was to be the most prosperous time in the history of Manaus, with it being described by some quarters as one of the world’s gaudiest cities, due to the sheer opulence and extravagance displayed by the wealthy rubber barons of this era. The city grew and grew, with monumental buildings such as the Amazon Opera House being completed in 1895 and appearing rather palace-like, with its giant dome and colourful facade. Inside the Opera House, expensive crystal and marble was used in a ‘no expense spared’ attitude, being shipped over from France. In total it cost more than US$10 million to build the Teatro Amazonas, which has since been restored and remains very much in operation to this day. Although the city had boomed for a while, the money was not always spent in a responsible manner. When rubber tree seeds were obtained by other tropical countries, Brazil was soon no longer the sole player in the rubber market and the fortunes of Manaus quickly declined, resulting in much of the city being reduced to poverty. The city had reaped the rewards from the rubber boom, with electricity arriving even before many cities in Europe had this modern energy, but ironically, the sudden collapse of this boom resulted in the generators being too costly to operate. As a result, Manaus lost its electric lighting for years and locals began to use candles and oil lamps once more. For the city, this felt like a huge step backwards and it was keen to regain its former ‘good times’.

The city was declared a duty free zone during the middle of the 20th century, which saw many people choosing to live here. In turn, this boosted its economy once more and its previously well-developed infrastructure slowly returned, although not to the extent of the glory days of the rubber boom.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

Portuguese is the official and national language of Brazil and is widely spoken by most of the population. The Portuguese dialects spoken in Brazil are collectively known as Brazilian Portuguese.

Important Types of Commerce in Manaus

Important industries in the Port of Manaus include manufacturing of soap, chemicals, electronic equipment as well as shipbuilding, brewing, and petroleum.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Manaus

Brochure, website, pamphlet, business card and important business literature with Portuguese translation will impress a Manaus business person. Certified translation creates a legally binding record recognized by Manaus directories, ministries, officials, courts and academic universities and institutions. All documents should also be translated into Portuguese to be considered by the ministry of foreign affairs in the company’s country of origin, and the Manaus ministry of foreign affairs.

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