Language Services For Almaty

Almaty, Kazakhstan’s largest metropolis, is set in the foothills of the Trans-Ili Alatau mountains. It served as the country’s capital until 1997 and remains Kazakhstan’s trading and cultural hub. Landmarks include the Central State Museum, displaying thousands of historic Kazakh artefacts. In the centre is Panfilov Park, home to the bright-yellow towers of Zenkov Cathedral, a tsarist-era Russian Orthodox church. Almaty lies in the northern foothills of the Trans-Ili Alatau at an elevation of 2,300–3,000 feet (700–900 metres), where the Bolshaya and Malaya Almaatinka rivers emerge onto the plain.

Historical, Cultural facts & Religion

Almaty was founded in 1854, when the Kazakhs were still nomads, as a Russian frontier fort named Verny on the site of the Silk Road oasis Almatu which had been laid waste by the Mongols. Cossacks and Siberian peasants settled around it, but the town was twice almost flattened by earthquakes, in 1887 and 1911.Culture. Before the Russian colonization, the Kazakhs had a highly developed culture based on their nomadic pastoral economy. Islam was introduced into the region with the arrival of the Arabs in the 8th century. In Almaty, there are more than 70 religious buildings and much more houses of prayer of different confessions. As it is traditional for Central Asia, the dominant religion in Kazakhstan is Islam, 9 million people profess it, and totally there are more than 2300 mosques all over the country.

Brief City  History

Almaty was founded in 1854, when the Kazakhs were still nomads, as a Russian frontier fort named Verny on the site of the Silk Road oasis Almatu which had been laid waste by the Mongols. Cossacks and Siberian peasants settled around it, but the town was twice almost flattened by earthquakes, in 1887 and 1911. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries it was a place of exile, its best-known outcast being Leon Trotsky. Renamed Alma-Ata (Father of Apples), it became the capital of Soviet Kazakhstan in 1927, and was connected to Siberia by the Turksib (Turkestan–Siberia) railway in 1930. The railway brought big growth and so did WWII, as factories were relocated here from the Nazi-threatened western USSR, and many Slavs came to work in them. Large numbers of ethnic Koreans, forcibly resettled from the Russian Far East, arrived at the same time. In the 1970s and early ’80s Kazakhstan’s leader Dinmukhamed Kunaev, the only Central Asian member of the Soviet Politburo, managed to steer lots of money southeast from Moscow to transform Alma-Ata from a provincial town into a worthy capital of a Soviet republic. Hence the number of buildings in relatively adventurous late-Soviet styles such as the Arasan Baths and Hotel Kazakhstan, and the stately piles such as the Academy of Sciences and the old parliament, now the Kazakh-British Technical University. Almaty saw the first unrest unleashed in Central Asia by the Gorbachev era of glasnost. Thousands took to the streets in December 1986 to protest against Kunaev’s replacement as head of the Communist Party of Kazakhstan by the Russian Gennady Kolbin. A counter-demo of workers armed with metal bars turned the protest into riots, police opened fire and possibly as many as 250 people were killed.

In 1991 Almaty was the venue for the meeting at which the USSR was finally pronounced dead, when all five Central Asian republics, plus Azerbaijan, Armenia and Moldova, joined the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States), founded by Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. The name Almaty, close to that of the original Silk Road settlement, replaced Alma-Ata soon after. Almaty lost its status as Kazakhstan’s capital in 1998 but remains the country’s commercial, social and cultural hub. In an ongoing property boom, ever more office towers, apartment blocks and shopping centers are pushing skyward, especially in the south of the city. The tarnished side of this shiny middle-class coin is represented by the shabby settlements of rural migrants and Kazakh returnees on the city’s outskirts.

Language (s) Written & Spoken

LANGUAGE Kazakhstan has two official languages, Kazakh, which is spoken fluently by about 30 percent of the population, and Russian, imposed by the large ethnic Russian population. In Russified Almaty, everyone speaks Russian, and it is the language on the street.

Important Types of Commerce in Almaty

The main products of the region were: Food: Meat, flour and cereals (pasta factory), milk, wines, canned fruit, tobacco, confectionery, alcoholic spirits, beer, yeast, and tea (packaging) Light industry: textiles, fur, knitting, carpets, footwear, apparel, printing, and the Almaty Cotton combine.

Language Services US and others will provide working with Almaty

Almaty is becoming a multicultural province that has a growing need for professional translations and interpreters. Almaty has a need for communication across languages and that is where language services can help. Whether you need Kazakh driver’s license translation, Kazakh marriage certificate translation, Kazakh business document translation or Kazakh legal document translation, Kazakh medical document translation, or a Kazakh website translation, language services can help.

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